Top 100 Games of The Decade (2010 – 2019)

by David
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The past decade was great for gaming. We saw many great releases like Red Dead Redemption, Grand Theft Auto 5, Fortnite and many more. This list isn’t by statistics like units sold or best reviews. This is just the top 100 games of the decade in our opinion. We hope you enjoy our favourite games of the decade from 2010 to 2019.

Top 100 Games of The Decade

1. Grand Theft Auto V (2013)

Image: Rockstar Games

There’s a reason why GTA V is the 3rd best selling game of all time, having sold over 115 million copies. The game also broke 7 Guinness World Records in 24 hours, including “Fastest entertainment property to gross $1 billion”.

GTA V is a true masterpiece of gaming. Rockstar spared no expense when making this game; the world is vast and the characters deep. The game is huge with so much to explore and so much going on around you. Whether you want to complete the missions, explore the world and see what wacky characters you find, build the best vehicle collection ever, or just go on a rampage killing spree, GTA V has it all. And that’s just the offline part of the game. The game also features a hugely popular online mode that allows you to complete missions as well as kill and race other people all over the world.

In total, GTA V has grossed over $6 billion (as of 2018) and shows no sign of slowing down. Rockstar Games truly is the king of sandbox games, and GTA V sits on top of not only that throne, but also the throne of being the best game of the last 10 years.

David Coulson

2. The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim (2011)

Image: Bethesda Game Studios

One of the most famous games of the decade. This game has been rereleased enough times to become a meme and for good reason. It’s a great game worth playing multiple times. The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim is a fantasy adventure RPG that pits you against dragons in Skyrim, a divided province of Tamriel. The world is vast and interesting with plenty of side quests to complete as you grow your character in whatever profession you like. Skyrim can be played seriously or while taking advantage of its very broken crafting system that can be used to make infinitely powerful weapons. Either way, the game is a treasure of the decade.

Jeanette Eicher

3. The Last of Us (2013)

Image: Naughty Dog

Trying to summarise the greatness of The Last of Us in so few words is difficult. Anyone who has played it would know. Troy Baker and Ashley Johnson truly make the game with their performances. The gameplay is solid, with RPG elements that keep it interesting, but Joel and Ellie’s relationship and the story of The Last of Us is what sets this game apart. From the start, you are emotionally attached to the characters. Their successes are your own. Their failures are heart-breaking. It’s a game fully deserving of all the praise it gets, and more.

Kyle Wilson

4. The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild (2017)

Image: Nintendo Life

The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild is one of the greatest video games of all time. Breath of the Wild was exactly what the Nintendo Switch needed to start off on the right foot. What’s so special about this game is the complete sense of adventure. A simple trip to a local village to restock on supplies can turn into 5-hour detour where you discover a hidden shrine, get struck by lightning, fall off a mountain, barely survive an encounter with a guardian, and almost freeze to death! The number of possibilities in this game is astounding! Even if you have never played a Zelda game before, buy a Switch, buy this game, and enjoy!

Zachary Whyte

5. God of War (2018)

Image: Santa Monica Studio

God of War elevated the series in a number of ways. It brought complexity to Kratos’ character, introduced Norse mythology to the series, and a new protagonist in the form of Atreus, Kratos’s son. As is the case with many PlayStation exclusives over the last few years, it is a beautiful game. I don’t think anyone can dispute that Dad-Beard Kratos is a vast improvement on Angry Not-Beard Kratos. Additionally, the gameplay is as good as it gets. The hacking-and-slashing of the series is not lost in this installment but rather improved upon. Alongside this, the abilities and upgrades system allows players to tweak the way they play to fit their own style.

Kyle Wilson

6. Marvel’s Spider-Man (2018)

Image: Insomniac Games

Spider-Man is an iconic superhero who has not had a decent game in a long time. 2018’s Spider-Man remedied that. With a vast open-world playground, a sinister villain lineup, strong storytelling, tons of side missions, and great DLC, it’s easy to lose yourself in the game. Add in how satisfying it is to web-sling yourself around New York City and this is easily one of the best games of the last decade.

Dan Tyrrell

7. Overwatch (2016)

Image: Blizzard Entertainment

Blizzard’s foray into the “hero shooter” genre has quickly become one of the hottest eSports titles and a firm favorite of gamers all around the world. For a game without any single-player campaign, Overwatch is full of stories and fleshed out characters. Aided by animated shorts and graphic novels, there is no character that feels out of place in the overall lore, yet they are all so unique in their designs and abilities. It is impossible to deny that Blizzard has done excellent work here, but the true credit should go to the voice actors. Each one brings the perfect characterization to their role, which only enhances the fun, objective-based gameplay.

Kyle Wilson

8. Super Smash Bros. Ultimate (2018)

The Super Smash Bros. series has been running for a while now, and this iteration is a smash hit among old and new fans. Every time I gather with a group of friends, Super Smash Bros. Ultimate is a go-to party game. The game is an intense fighter featuring many characters from across several game series to play as. Smash Ultimate can take up to 8 players, making it ideal for large parties interested in some action-based fun. It also has a competitive side for players interested in going beyond friendly fighting fun. This game is a must-have for Nintendo Switch owners and anyone with gaming friends.

Jeanette Eicher

9. Mario Kart 8 (2014)

Image: Nintendo

Mario Kart just seems to get better with age. Each new console entry is better than the last, and Mario Kart 8 is no exception. The game contains 48 courses as well as all of your favourite characters from Mario, Princess Peach, Bowser, and even a whole host of characters from other franchises such as The Legend Of Zelda, Splatoon & more.


Mario Kart 8 was a system seller on the Wii U. The game went on to sell over 8 million copies. This is a huge number, even more so when you consider that only 13 million Wii U consoles were sold. But if you missed it on the Wii U (and we wouldn’t blame you) you can also get it on the Nintendo Switch with all of its DLC. The Nintendo Switch version has sold over 19 million copies. Mario Kart is the king of cart racers, but Nintendo doesn’t rest on their laurels. They continue to improve the series, and I can’t wait for Mario Kart 9. Well, it’ll probably be Mario Kart X since no company seems to like the number 9.

David Coulson

10. Fortnite (2017)

Image: Epic Games

In the 2 short years that Fortnite has been out, it has completely changed the landscape of gaming. The game itself is well-made, something you’d expect from the creator of its engine. It looks great and is available on every platform you can think of from phones and consoles to PC. One great thing (or sometimes not so great) about Fortnite is that it’s constantly changing. With near-weekly updates, there’s always something to do and something new to explore and try. Fortnite has also changed the way many developers release and monetise their games. Many developers have chosen to abandon the old paid DLC model and instead release content for free and use non-P2W microtransactions to monetise their games, such as with cosmetic skins and battle/season passes.

It has also launched the careers of many gamers, content creators, and
streamers. A 16-year-old won $3 million in a Fortnite tournament this year. It also helped propel Ninja’s career which, love or hate him, has done nothing but great things for the gaming industry. Ninja became the first gamer on the cover of ESPN and most recently the first gamer to have his own signature shoe, courtesy of Adidas. No one could’ve ever dreamed that gaming and eSports would get to their current point, no longer seen as the hobby of basement dwellers and instead a widely acceptable form of entertainment. And while Fortnite can’t take all the credit, it has certainly played a big part.

David Coulson

11. Rocket League (2015)

Image: Psyonix

“Football, but with rocket-powered cars.” Okay, I’m sold. On July 7, 2015, Rocket League was put onto the Playstation Store as a free game via PlayStation Plus. It was met with mass downloads that exceeded the capacity of the servers. Despite the rocky launch, Rocket League has exceeded all expectations, having sold millions of copies, developed a thriving Esports scene, and enabled cross-platform play between the PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Switch and PC! Rocket League looks set to be around for a long, long time!

Zachary Whyte

12. The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt (2015)

Image: CD Projekt Red

The sheer amount of content in the core game is impressive. The vast open world has plenty of rewarding and challenging experiences for those who wish to adventure off the beaten path, and if swashbuckling isn’t your activity of choice, there is always the option of a nice quiet game of Gwent. Both DLC expansions, Hearts of Stone and Blood and Wine, each add more quests, new monsters, and even new cards, giving you everything you could ever want more of from the original game.

—Eric Bogart

13. Uncharted 4: A Thief’s End (2016)

Image: Naughty Dog

Uncharted is a flagship series for Sony, one of the greatest third-person action-adventures ever made, and possibly the greatest game series of all time. Uncharted has great cover-shooting, lovable characters, excellent storytelling, solid puzzle-solving, and enjoyable platforming. Uncharted 4 is one of the best games in the series and an absolute treat of a send-off (presumably) for such a great series.

Dan Tyrrell

14. Crash Bandicoot N. Sane Trilogy (2017)

Taking something that already evokes such a strong sense of nostalgia and then making it better is a tall order. That’s precisely what the Crash Bandicoot N. Sane Trilogy does. With completely re-worked visuals and some touches of modernization, the Crash Bandicoot N. Sane Trilogy exceeds my memory of the game. Such an excellent remake of an already legendary series in the platforming genre has to be recognized.

Dan Tyrrell

15. Minecraft (2011)

Image: Mojang

Although Minecraft was technically released last decade in 2009, the game has since been re-released for console and updated enough times to be a game of this decade. Moreover, with updates, mods, and multiple revivals, Minecraft may as well be the immortal overlord of all things video game. Considering Minecraft is the most sold video game of all time, chances are you’ve already played it. The game is perfect for LAN parties, friend realms, and servers. Possibilities for this survival game are endless in randomly generated worlds and limitless community modding. If survival isn’t your thing, then maybe you’d like the creative mode where you can build anything with unlimited resources. All you need to do is image search ‘Minecraft build’ to get an idea of how vast the creative aspect of Minecraft is. The game is available everywhere.

Jeanette Eicher

16. Horizon Zero Dawn (2017)

Image: Amazon

Horizon Zero Dawn is a game everyone must play. That’s just a fact. Guerilla Games’ unique take on the apocalypse genre marries breathtaking storytelling with amazing gameplay throughout. The combat gameplay against the machines never loses its charm with a range of weapons giving players a lot of freedom in how they tackle each situation. Aloy (and Ashley Burch’s performance) is a truly gripping protagonist and is arguably the best part about the game. There is no doubt that Horizon Zero Dawn deserves to be on this list.

Kyle Wilson

17. Spyro Reignited Trilogy (2018)

Image: Nintendo

Spyro is on this list for all of the same reasons the Crash Bandicoot N. Sane Trilogy is. The game is a beautiful rework of a timeless classic. If you grew up playing Spyro, this game will bring you back to that time but with the comforts of modern graphics and some quality of life improvements. Any time a game lives up to your memory of the original, it should be acknowledged as excellent.

Dan Tyrrell

18. Super Mario Odyssey (2017)

Image: Nintendo

When my girlfriend sits all day playing a video game, you know it must be good, because she doesn’t like playing games. But between us, we sank 50 hours into Super Mario Odyssey and had so much fun. Mario games generally introduce a new mechanic specific to that game. Sunshine had the hose, Galaxy had the motion controls, and Odyssey has Cappy, allowing you to become enemies, objects, dinosaurs and more. The story is charming, the gameplay is great as expected, the level design is spot-on, and there’s plenty of worlds to explore, moons to collect, and things to do.


Its very easy to jump onto Mario Odyssey for an hour and then realise its now night time and you’ve done nothing else with your day.

David Coulson

19. The Walking Dead (2012)

Image: MSPoweruser

If you had said back in 2012 that the Game of the Year was going to be an episodic graphic adventure game with numerous quick time events, people would have burst out laughing. Well, they aren’t laughing anymore. They’re crying from how sad and depressing this game is. Set just after a zombie apocalypse, you must play as Lee Everett who must lead a group of survivors to safety, including an eight year old girl called Clementine. Throughout the game, you are tasked with making several difficult choices that will have long-term consequences affecting you and other characters.

But it’s the relationship between Lee and Clementine that sets this game apart. Never have I been so attached to a group of characters. The game was so compelling and effective that Telltale then spent the next seven years trying to make a game as good, but they never did. Rest in peace Telltale. Now let’s hope that The Wolf Among Us Season 2 isn’t cancelled.

Zachary Whyte

20. Portal 2 (2011)

Image: IGN

Portal 2, much like Portal, provides challenging puzzles with new mechanics alongside a funny story that flushes out the history of Aperture. The characters are charming despite being robots, and the gameplay is as unique as it was in the first Portal. There is also a co-op mode that you can play through with a friend. The multiplayer is a completely separate campaign with a bit of new story and many new puzzles that require working together. It takes place after the single-player campaign. Portal 2 is playable on Microsoft Windows, Linux, Macintosh, Xbox 360, and PS3. And don’t worry; there’s no cake in this game.

Jeanette Eicher

21. Cuphead (2017)

Image: Studio MDHR

Two things come to mind when you think about Cuphead: Hard and Beautiful. The game is so frustrating, yet it is very fun, and it is not easy to achieve that balance. Cuphead is an old school-arcade-retro style 2D game focused on boss fights. The game is quite straightforward without being boring. You might need a lot of tries to finish the game, but it is a very rewarding feeling to actually do it.


Another thing that makes Cuphead so good is over three hours of amazing original ragtime, big band, and jazz music, as well as beautiful hand-drawn art. The visuals of this game are so incredible it will keep you going despite its brutally hard gameplay.

Zoran Papak

22. Counter-Strike: Global Offensive (2012)

Image: Steam

CS:GO in a nutshell: Terrorists vs Counter-Terrorists. Both sides are tasked with eliminating the other while also completing separate objectives. The Terrorists must plant the bomb while Counter-Terrorists must either prevent the bomb from being planted or defuse the bomb, an incredibly simple concept that’s saved by a steep learning curve (7 years later I still can’t control my AK spray!) The CS:GO cycle = watch professional Counter-Strike, get the urge to play, queue up Dust 2, hit ready up, get killed by hacker/smurf, lose the match, queue up Dust 2 once again. This is the endless pattern of CS:GO, and I love it! Heading into 2020, CS:GO is still going strong with average player numbers being at an all time high! Counter-Strike seems to be the series that will never die!

Zachary Whyte

23. Red Dead Redemption 2 (2018)

Red Dead Redemption 2 is simply incredible. Rockstar Games doesn’t make bad games. That much has become clear over the last decade. Red Dead Redemption 2 might be their best, though. It throws you into the deep end of Wild West-era America with an overwhelming array of activities and events. It isn’t all train-robbing and bank hold-ups, though. Red Dead Redemption 2 has packed in so much detail that you can spend hours just maintaining your camp if that’s what you fancy! Not only this, but Red Dead Redemption 2’s random encounters keep gameplay fresh and perfectly reflect the true essence of the Wild West genre.

Kyle Wilson

24. PlayerUnknown’s Battlegrounds (2017)

Image: PUBG Corporation

After H1Z1 popularized the Battle Royale genre in the gaming world, PlayerUnknown’s Battlegrounds took it to the next level. The game became so popular around the world that PUBG had many issues with servers crashing because the developers never expected the game to get that big.


PUBG had the best graphics, shooting mechanics, weapons, and vehicles in the genre, so it became a favorite PC game for a lot of streamers. People like Shroud and Dr. Disrespect played it for months, and it was one of the most popular games on Twitch. PUBG has a very successful mobile game as well, but their attempt to expand to consoles wasn’t very successful.

Zoran Papak

25. Super Mario Galaxy 2 (2010)

Image: Nintendo

Nintendo took the already near-flawless Super Mario Galaxy and somehow managed to make it even better. One of the earliest games on this list, it was released in the 1st half of 2010, but is without a doubt one of the best. The game is huge, too, featuring 242 collectable Power Stars, so there’s a lot to keep you occupied, and it never gets boring. The game features a whole host of power ups that we’d expect from the Mario universe and also includes the addition of Yoshi, further expanding gameplay.


Regardless of whether you love or hate the Wii’s Motion Controls, there’s no denying that they worked perfectly with the Super Mario Galaxy series. I know Nintendo doesn’t really do true Mario sequels, so I’m surprised we got 2 to be honest, but I would love to see Super Mario Galaxy 3 released one day.

David Coulson

26. Pokémon Sword and Shield (2019)

Image: Nintendo

After months of the internet community trashing Pokémon Sword & Shield because of a tree texture, it was finally released last month and shut the haters up. Many fans, myself included, have been dreaming of a true home console Pokémon game since 1998, and it delivers. The gameplay is as fun as ever, the Pokédex is manageable (come on, 800+ was just getting a bit silly), and all the features you’d expect are there and more. This game is a joy to play for any hardcore Pokémon fan but also accessible to newer players. At the time of writing this, I have over 50 hours clocked into the game and I haven’t gotten close to doing everything I want to do in the game. If you’re a Switch owner, there’s no reason why you shouldn’t buy this game. If I can get over the fact that my beloved Bulbasaur got cut, you can too.

David Coulson

27. Mass Effect 2 (2010)

Image: BioWare

The original Mass Effect title was fantastic, but it hardly compares to its sequel. Mass Effect 2 amped up the stakes of the first title to deliver a blockbuster sci-fi adventure where players travel across the Milky Way to save humanity. Mass Effect 2’s cast of characters all add to the compelling storytelling delivered by Bioware and come together for one of the greatest final missions available. Throughout, an excellent performance from Martin Sheen as the Illusive Man keeps the tension high and the pressure on. Mass Effect 2 is hard to put down and impossible to forget.

Kyle Wilson

28. Tom Clancy’s Rainbow Six Siege (2015)

Image: Ubisoft

Rainbow Six Siege is the king of tactical shooters. While R6S did not have the best initial launch, the constant support and updating must be commended. Additionally, the team-based gameplay, destructible environments, dead-and-your-round-is-over mechanic, and competitive scene must be celebrated. Rainbow Six Siege is a shining example of what the games-as-a-service and eSports models can bring us.

Dan Tyrrell

29. Persona 5 (2016)

The fatigue of Persona 4 and its plethora of offshoot games left the fans ready for a new adventure. After the reveal trailer at E3 2015, everyone was all aboard the Persona 5 hype train, but we never could’ve seen what was coming. Persona 5 takes everything that the series is known for and brings it together in a way that only Persona 5 could.

—Eric Bogart

30. Rayman Legends (2013)

Image: Ubisoft

It is pretty much universally agreed upon that Mario is the King of platformers. Well, Rayman has definitely given Mario a run for his money. I admit that I have never been the biggest Rayman fan, but that all changed with the last-gen and the release of Rayman Origins & Legends. Legends is the sequel to Origins and continue in a similar (but vastly improved) manner. The landscape is beautiful, the mechanics are flawless, and there’s just enough comedy to be amusing without being cringy. This game would probably be in my top 3 favourite 2D platformers of all time. It’s truly amazing, and you owe it to yourself to play it whether on PC or current-gen consoles. Find a copy and have an amazing time. You won’t be disappointed.

David Coulson

31. Call of Duty: Black Ops 2 (2012)

Image: Treyarch

32. Stardew Valley (2016)

Image: Sickhead Games

Stardew Valley is a strange mix of Harvest Moon and dungeon crawler with a charming 8-bit aesthetic. You farm, dungeon crawl, and generally just have a fun and relaxing time, and while the love for Stardew Valley can be a polarizing topic, if it fits your tastes, you will love it.

Dan Tyrrell

33. Apex Legends (2019)

Image: Respawn Entertainment

Apex Legends, Respawn Entertainment’s free-to-play battle royale, has quickly become a favorite and easily deserves a place on this list. It’s unlike other games in the genre, arguably elevating it to a higher standard. Apex Legends brings the “hero shooters” system to the genre, alongside the gameplay of a triple-A title. The cast is full of lovable, unique characters with abilities that further add to the strategy required to succeed in a battle royale. The lobby size may be smaller than most in the genre, but that doesn’t mean Apex Legends doesn’t offer a fast-paced, action-packed experience.

Kyle Wilson

34. Sid Meier’s Civilization VI (2016)

Image: Steam

The Civilization series is one of the best turn-based strategy games on the market. Whether battling against the computer, friends, or random players, it is the pinnacle of resource management and long-game strategy. While not the highest-rated Civilization game, it is highly polished and deserves the nod to be on this list.

Dan Tyrrell

35. Halo: Reach (2010)

Image: Bungie

The Halo series has been around for a while and has changed hands from Bungie to 343 Studios. Halo: Reach was the last Halo game made by Bungie. The game is a treasure from this decade from one of the most popular series of the previous decade. Halo: Reach just recently came out for Microsoft Windows, and based on its success in the Steam store, the game is still popular today. It is an FPS shooter in a sci-fi environment. Your mission as Noble 6 is to fend off the Covenant, a religious alien force that has invaded the human-occupied planet, Reach. It is a prequel to the main series. If an excellent campaign isn’t what you are looking for then no worries. Halo: Reach has one of the best multiplayer experiences of both the FPS genre and of the Halo series.

Jeanette Eicher

36. Batman: Arkham City (2011)

Image: Rocksteady Studios

Batman was always hit-and-miss when it came to video games until Rocksteady came out of nowhere with its Arkham series. This delivered to us the freeflow combat system, one of the greatest combat systems of all time that truly makes you feel like you are the Dark Knight! Out of three Arkham games, Batman Arkham City is by far my favourite. With a huge city for you to explore, challenging and unique boss battles, and some of the best performances ever in a video game, (Mark Hamill will always be the Joker for me!) Arkham City delivers near perfection! Now we can please get that Superman game, Rocksteady?

Zachary Whyte

37. L.A. Noire (2011)

Image: Steam

L.A. Noire offers a different take on the open world formula, delivering an experience not seen before or since. You play as Cole Phelps, a police detective in 1940s Los Angeles. You must examine crime scenes, find clues, talk with witnesses, and come to an eventual conclusion. The key selling point of L.A. Noire is the interrogation system in which you are challenged to read the suspect’s face to determine whether or not they’re lying to you. This works because of top-notch performances from the actors along with the fantastic facial animations that still hold up to this day! Now can we have a detective game set in the modern era, please?

Zachary Whyte

38. Bloodborne (2015)

Image: Polygon

FromSoftware took the bast components from Dark Souls and Demon’s Souls and put them together for Bloodborne. The game is a good mix of Gothic nightmare and interesting storyline with an amazing atmosphere and gameplay.


The theme of the game is similar to Dark Souls, but it forces the player to be much more aggressive since they removed the shield safety from Dark Souls. The game feels familiar with its classic well-made boss fights, but Bloodborne has its own charm and it is definitely a success.

Zoran Papak

39. DOOM (2016)

Image: Bethesda

Do I need to give a reason? This is freakin’ DOOM. DOOM 2016 is everything you could wish for in a DOOM game: the gameplay is fast, the enemies are hard-hitting, the weapons are amazing and fun to use, and there’s so much gore. Coupled with Mick Gordon’s amazing soundtrack, this is arguably one of the best shooters of not just this decade, but of all time. iD Software have put themselves back on the map with this game. Even the Switch port is perfect (I generally avoid third party Switch ports because they’re usually terrible). Next year we get DOOM Eternal, and I can’t wait to go back to Hell and unleash havoc and fury upon everything in my path.

David Coulson

40. Saints Row IV (2013)

Image: Volition

While the core concept of the super-powered Saints Row 4 is an even further departure from the Tarantino-like cinematic experience of Saints Row 2 and the “gangsta” origins of the series, it seems to draw its inspiration in part from the Saints Flow powers in its predecessor’s The Trouble With Clones DLC. The result is the kind of chaotic open world that fans of the Saints Row series will readily recognize. It remains to be seen in what direction, exactly, the company will take the upcoming Saints Row 5.

—Thomas Fitzpatrick

41. Undertale (2015)

Image: tobyfox

At first look, Undertale seems like yet another ordinary indie RPG. However, it is much, much more than that. The game is written so well, and it’s one of the few games that will bring all the emotions out of you and will make you laugh with teary eyes.


The story is about a child that falls into a world of monsters. However, there is a twist. Instead of killing every monster you find like in every other game, you have the option to spare their lives. Every monster you kill (or don’t kill) will affect the path and the outcome of the game. Also, Undertale gave us so many good memes which gives the game some extra points on the Top 100 games of the decade list.

Zoran Papak

42. Fire Emblem: Three Houses (2019)

The latest installment of the Fire Emblem games, Fire Emblem: Three Houses is a joy to play. Combat is turn-based. You move your units around a grid-based map and fight off various enemies throughout a story-driven campaign filled with dynamic characters. You choose a class to teach at the beginning of the game and follow along with that path, and there are multiple endings depending on the chosen class. The gameplay is split between combat, training students, and exploring the monastery while performing tasks. Since you can train the students in whatever way you please and there are multiple stories and endings, the game has solid replayability. Fire Emblem: Three Houses is available on the Nintendo Switch.

Jeanette Eicher

43. Dark Souls (2011)

Image: From Software

Dark Souls is one of the hardest games ever made, and it drove people crazy to complete. However, its difficulty was there for a reason, and it is not the reason why this game is on the list, even though it is not for everyone.


Dark Souls is much more than just a hard game. When you look past its extreme difficulty, it has a beautifully-designed shadowy world that is a joy to explore. Some locations are iconic, and combat is precise. Dark Souls’ unique and extremely well-designed bosses took the experience to another level and set an example for the future of the genre. It is a game you hate or love at first, but if you give yourself to the game, you will have a perfectly balanced love-hate relationship and will feel extreme satisfaction with each boss defeated.

Zoran Papak

44. Red Dead Redemption (2010)

Image: Red Bull

Grand Theft Auto in the Wild West, I don’t really need to say much more than that. Take control of John Marston as you take over the Wild West and cause lots of carnage. Kill people, evade law enforcement, gamble, be a nice citizen, its entirely up to you. Rockstar are the Kings of sandbox games and it doesn’t matter whether the game is set in the present or a long time ago, Rockstar still nail it.

David Coulson

45. Destiny 2 (2017)

Image: Forbes

Remember Halo: Reach? I mentioned that Bungie left the Halo series behind after making that game, and Destiny is the game that Bungie moved on to, with Destiny 2 the latest in the series. Bungie made a contract with Activision to make a new game for the Destiny series every two years along with DLC for the games. Now that Bungie has left Activision, it looks like Destiny 2 is here to stay. If you are interested in the sci-fi FPS with space magic then now is the best time to get into it. Destiny 2 is an MMO, so be prepared for grinding levels and items. Core mechanics and the feel of the game are fantastic, while the story and world are interesting and fun to explore. The game has both PvE and PvP, so there is a little something for everyone. The game is available on PS4, Xbox One, and Steam.

Jeanette Eicher

46. Tomb Raider (2013)

Image: Crystal Dynamix

Between 1996-2003, Lara Croft was the undisputed Queen of video games. The Tomb Raider series was an instant success after its debut on the PS1 way back in 1996. The series found its greatest success in 1997 with the release of Tomb Raider 2. Everyone and their Nan has locked the butler in the freezer at least once, legend has it he’s still stuck in there. The series took a bit of a nosedive in the mid 2000s before finally being rebooted in 2013 with Tomb Raider, Lara Croft was back! Tomb Raider is one of the greatest action & adventure games of the 7th generation with immersive graphics, smooth gameplay and lots of ways to explore the jungles and tombs of Yamatai. Tomb Raider went on to sell over 11 million copies and spawned 2 sequels, Rise of the Tomb Raider & Shadow of the Tomb Raider. It seems that Lara isn’t ready to give up her throne just yet.

David Coulson

47. Ori and the Blind Forest (2015)

This game is a piece of art. Most games use textures and models to fill the player’s vision, but Ori and the Blind Forest is hand-painted. The game also has a beautiful soundtrack, making it one of the most amazing games to experience. With all this eye and ear candy, you have to wonder if the gameplay itself is any good. It is. Ori and the Blind Forest is a puzzle-platformer game that provides plenty of challenges to face along with a story that will make you cry before the end of the prologue. The mechanics of the game are buttery smooth and the abilities are brilliant, fun, and unique. Personally, I don’t normally play platformers, but this game captured me. That’s how amazing it is. It’s a game that anyone can love. You can play the game on Microsoft Windows, Xbox One, and the Nintendo Switch.

Jeanette Eicher

48. Fallout 4 (2015)

Image: Bethesda Game Studios

Much like its excellent predecessors, Fallout 3 and Fallout: New Vegas, this apocalyptic adventure will suck so much time from your life! With an enormous world to explore, a great crafting system, and interesting factions, this leaves Fallout 4 as one of the most memorable experiences of this gaming decade. Even the technical difficulties that are all too common in Bethesda games don’t ruin the overall experience.


Zachary Whyte

49. Fallout: New Vegas (2010)

Image: Obsidian Entertainment

With a Big Iron on your hip, Fallout: New Vegas was the perfect successor to Bethesda’s hugely-successful Fallout 3. It built on everything that made Fallout 3 great; it had an expansive open world, exciting quest-lines, and tweaked gameplay that only improved the experience. The main story of the game was great, too. Revenge is an excellent motivator, and the antagonist of Fallout: New Vegas is easily hatable right from the start. Every time I close my eyes, I can still see that checkered suit jacket…

Kyle Wilson

50. Firewatch (2016)

Image: Campo Santo Quarterly

Firewatch was much anticipated when it launched—a fantastic narrative exploration game with a beautiful art style. No one was sure what to expect, but what we ended up with was a fulfilling experience that evoked emotion throughout. Firewatch is peaceful, mysterious, beautiful, and a must-play.

Dan Tyrrell

51. Uncharted 3: Drake’s Deception (2011)

The third entry in Naughty Dog’s Playstation exclusive Uncharted series continues the adventures of Nathan Drake. This time around, he is searching for the Atlantis of the Sands. Naughty Dog takes every game extremely seriously and always takes time with the game they are developing. The graphics, the story, characters, and locations are all top-notch for the time. It is a great mesh of climbing, shooting, exploring as well as classic Uncharted riddle-solving.


The game has some drawbacks like shooting and sometimes weird AI, but it shouldn’t stop you from enjoying the game, even if you want to give it a shot in 2020.

Zoran Papak

52. Cities: Skylines (2015)

Image: IGN

Cities: Skylines is everything Sim City should’ve been. You can spend hours upon hours building out your city in this amazingly addictive real-time strategy and resource management game. Whether the game makes you feel for your local leaders or not, you are sure to face both problematic and rewarding decisions. There is very little more satisfying than hitting pause and admiring your sprawling metropolis.

Dan Tyrrell

53. Diablo III (2012)

Image: Variety

Diablo is the greatest third-person hack-and-slash dungeon crawler action RPG series of all time. Diablo 3 takes all of the best parts about the series, elevates them, adds polish and new ideas, and combines it all with more modern technology and graphics. Whether you prefer to play casually, solo, with friends, or use advanced data-analytics for every item drop, there is something here for you. Probably the most significant component to Diablo 3 being on the radar for Game of the Decade is that it’s the first Diablo since the original to come to console.

Dan Tyrrell

54. Until Dawn (2015)

Image: Forbes

A lot of horror games get a bad rep. It is challenging to do right, but when they nail it, they end up being fantastic. Until Dawn is one such game. Based around a decision-making mechanic and heavily relying on story-driven gameplay, Until Dawn delivers an excellent horror experience. The decisions you make decide who lives and who dies, and the game takes a delicious supernatural twist towards the end. If you are a horror fan, make sure to check it out.

Dan Tyrrell

55. The Sims 4 (2014)

The Sims 4 is a simulation game where you create people, referred to as Sims, and simulate life. You can make choices for them, control their every move, or have them run independently. The game is all about messing with life. The gameplay doesn’t stop there; you can build houses, parks, gyms, restaurants, and basically whatever else you can think of if you set your mind to it. The game was published by EA, so the DLC can be a bit much. Other than that, the game is fun to play for people who like the sandbox experience. The Sims series is widely popular as a more relaxing game to play. The Sims 4 is available in the Origin store.

Jeanette Eicher

56. Assetto Corsa (2014)

Image: Steam

There are a lot of outstanding racing car games, but very few of them rise to the level of real racing simulation. Of the true racing simulation options, only one is available across all platforms. That one game is Assetto Corsa, boasting a wide variety of cars and tracks, regular online racing, leagues, mods (on PC), and even a career mode. There are more accessible racing games, but no other true racing simulation is as widely available.

Dan Tyrrell

57. Prey (2017)

Image: T3

Prey is a psychological thriller, horror, FPS, survival, RPG. Yeah, the game is intense. In Prey, you fight for your survival as the space station you are on is taken over by hive-mind aliens. This is one of the few PvE experiences that makes you think about every fight you pick because the aliens can kill you with ease if you aren’t careful. The FPS experience is smooth and challenging while also bringing in unique weapons that almost make combat and survival into a puzzle game. The story is interesting and provides several choices and endings. Prey can be played on Microsoft Windows, Xbox One, and PS4.

Jeanette Eicher

58. Resident Evil 2 (2019)

Image: Microsoft

A personal note: I am slightly disappointed in the position this game finished at, but that’s democracy. I’m not one to use the word masterpiece all too often, but it’s definitely fitting with Resident Evil 2, a remake of arguably one of the greatest games of all time. The game takes you back to 1998 inside Raccoon City, and Leon and Claire both stumble into a nightmare. We have long imagined what Raccoon City would look like with modern graphics, and it looked nothing like this in my head. This is so much better. The RE engine is one of the best engines in modern gaming, and this showcases it perfectly. Graphically, it is stunning, the gameplay is near flawless, and Mr. X is damn terrifying. I’m not going to deny that Mr. X has made me squeal like a girl on more than one occasion.

If you’re a fan of horror games then turn down the lights and get ready to experience a true survival horror masterpiece. This is in my personal top 5 games this decade, and with RE3 Remake right around the corner, I’m expecting that to be in my top 5 next decade, too.

David Coulson

59. Pokémon HeartGold and SoulSilver (2010)

Image: Pokémon/Nintendo

Pokémon Gold and Silver are widely considered by many to be some of the best Pokémon games of all time, so having the ability to replay them with generation four graphics and the addition of allowing Pokémon in your party to follow you (much like in Pokémon Yellow) makes for a magnificent Pokémon journey that you will never forget! 


Zachary Whyte

60. Detroit: Become Human (2018)

TechSpot

Detroit: Become Human is a fantastic game. Despite it being a largely cinematic experience, reminiscent of a Telltale game, Detroit: Become Human is engaging and more than fun to play. It is wholly driven by the story of its three protagonists, and this isn’t a bad thing. Quantic Dream effortlessly intertwines the stories to create a complex narrative. The game features a flowchart feature at the end of each section, highlighting its expansiveness. It drives you to replay the story. Detroit: Become Human is a thought-provoking masterpiece that wholly deserves to be considered one of the best games of the decade.

Kyle Wilson

61. Kingdom Hearts III (2019)

Image: Square Enix

The thrilling finale to the Kingdom Hearts series takes the adventure above and beyond from presentation to gameplay. Every world uses all the new Flowmotion mechanics to its fullest to get around large locales we never thought we would get to explore.  The versatility of magic (not just as a weapon but also as a method of travel) opens up all new ways to find enemies. Every boss fight feels climatic and challenging as a finale to whichever world you find yourself on, and the capacity for combinations between magic, shotlocks, and keyblades lets the player choose whatever playstyle fits them best while the Gummi Ship segments have never been as good as they are now.

—Eric Bogart

62. Endless Legend (2014)

Endless Legend is a turn-based 4X game in a fantasy setting. There is no campaign. You can fight against AI or find some humans to play with. You can play as a variety of factions from dragon people to people with cities built on the back of giant scarabs. Faction perks can even be changed to create custom factions. With randomly generated maps, buildable factions, and multiple ways to win, the game has a good amount of replay value. Another part that distinguishes Endless Legend from other 4X games is that battles are done using groups of units that split and fight on a field in a DnD-like fashion. It brings in new strategies that can allow you to turn the tides of an unfavorable fight.

Jeanette Eicher

63. Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain (2015)

Image: Instant Gaming

I describe Metal Gear Solid V as the worst 10/10 game of all time. I believe that sums up the game perfectly: incredible graphics, amazing AI, and some of the best stealth sandbox gameplay of all time! But it’s also broken, unfinished, and has stupid micro-transactions. (thanks, Konami) Although it lacks the excellent story that previous Metal Gear games possess, the gameplay more than makes up for it. It’s a MASTERPIECE, just please don’t make anymore Metal Gear games, Konami. We barely survived the travesty that was Metal Gear Survive.

Zachary Whyte

64. Paladins (2016)

Image: Playstation

Ah, Paladins. The dead game. The Overwatch clone. Another Hi-Rez failure. Nonsense; ignore those stupid comments and give Paladins a try. Once you do, you will find an incredible free-to-play hero shooter. There are four types of roles for your champions. You’ve got Front Line, Damage, Support, and Flank. Being a team-based shooter, you must rely on strategy, character knowledge, coordination, and teamwork in order to attain victory. With the game being free-to-play and running at 60 FPS on all consoles, there is no excuse for you to not give the game a try. Find some friends to join you and enjoy a terrific competitive experience.

Zachary Whyte

65. Journey (2012)

Journey is a game about exploration and enjoying the ride you are on. It only takes about two hours to complete, but it will make you feel a broad spectrum of emotions along the way. Built into the game is a mechanic where you may encounter others on your journey. You have no way to communicate with them and don’t even know who they are until the end credits roll. This mechanic leads to some engaging and emotional experiences as you complete the game.

Dan Tyrrell

66. Devil May Cry 5 (2018)

Action-packed hack and slash series Devil May Cry returns to the original characters after years in the stunning game. The combat is smooth and stylish, and each playable character has a unique combat style with a new-to-the-series character boasting the most unique combat I have ever seen in a fighting game. Playing V, the new character, is like playing Pokémon if it was a mature action game. Apart from that, the rest of the game is exactly what you would expect from the Devil May Cry series. The campaign is intriguing and engaging as you jump around the month during which the story takes place and slowly reveal more context as to how everything happened. Of course, just the combat experience itself is good without all this character development. Devil May Cry 5 can be played on Microsoft Windows, Xbox One, and PS4.

Jeanette Eicher

67. The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time 3D (2011)

This one was a tricky one. Do we include it or do we not include it? It is technically just an N64 game ported with better graphics, but Ocarina Of Time is a true masterpiece. Very few games deserve that moniker, but this definitely is one of them. Nintendo somehow took an already amazing game and made it even better. Ocarina Of Time was my first introduction to the Legend of Zelda series, as with many others too. The story is fantastic; it sees a young boy discover that he’s the chosen one and, through some weird time travel stuff involving a sword, is able to save Hyrule. The soundtrack has some of the greatest pieces of music in gaming history, but to be fair, this is Koji Kondo. Would you expect anything less?
If you have a 3DS, I highly recommend you play this. If you don’t, then play the original on N64. If you don’t have an N64, emulate it, I don’t care. You need to experience this masterpiece.

David Coulson

68. Life Is Strange (2015)

Image: Dontnod Entertainment

Story-driven games (with a more cinematic experience and a lesser emphasis on gameplay) saw a huge growth in popularity during the past decade. However, they give players a variety of options to navigate the storyline with the decisions they choose.


Life Is Strange follows the story of a young student named Max and her rebel friend, Chloe. Every choice you make has consequences down the road, but this small studio, Dontnod, did an amazing job of telling the story. You feel like you are a part of the game in a way you won’t feel in most other games in the genre. You develop a relationship with the characters and feel their struggles as well share their happiness. The game is very well-written and acted, bringing the experience to another level. It does have that “teen drama” aspect which a lot of people don’t like, but I doubt it will bother you in Life Is Strange.

Zoran Papak

69. Celeste (2018)

Image: Steam

Celeste is a game that almost passed me by. You may be put off by the 8-bit graphics, especially when considering the level of graphics we see in 2019, but you would be a fool to let this pass you by. Celeste is a 2D platformer game designed for speed running and precision reflexes. This isn’t your typical “jump on the enemies head and save the princess” style of platformer. This is a difficult game that requires complete focus and attention, and you will be punished for not nailing a sequence of button presses. Thankfully, there’s no life limit or continues, because I died well into the thousands by the time I finished this. I am so glad I decided to check this little game out, because it has become one of my all-time favourite games.

David Coulson

70. Beat Saber (2018)

Image: TechCrunch

Rhythm games have been around for a long time, the 70s in fact, but they really took off in the 90s with games such as Dance Dance Revolution in the arcades. Popularity continued to grow into the 2000s with games such as Guitar Hero on console. Then all of a sudden, the trend just seemed to die. Well, fast forward to 2018 and Beat Games decided to release a VR rhythm games called Beat Saber and breathed new life into the Rhythm genre. The game is essentially a rhythm game where you use 2 light saber looking objects to slash directional blocks in time to music. It reminds me of Guitar Hero crossed with Fruit Ninja, but VR. It has already won various awards including numerous “VR Game of the Year” awards and shows Virtual Reality is here to stay.

David Coulson

71. Resident Evil 7: Biohazard (2017)

Image: Voidu

After a decade of action, QTEs and boulder smashing, it was finally time for the Resident Evil series to return to what made it great: the horror. It seems Capcom decided to give us a decade’s worth of horror in one game to make up for lost time. This game is freaky. The Baker family have been possessed and have had their minds altered and controlled by a little girl who isn’t actually a little girl. Yeah, it’s weird. This game is a mind f*ck in the best possible way. From death and decay to over the top levels of gore, RE7 delivers on all fronts and welcomed us back to horror with open arms. My only gripe with the game is that it took a lot of inspiration from the current trend of games like Outlast, but it’s a step in the right direction and has perfectly set up the next chapter of Resident Evil.

David Coulson

72. FIFA 12 (2011)

With all due respect to hardcore FIFA fans, EA’s game was very underwhelming for the entire 2000s, and PES dominated the market of football simulations. However, FIFA 12 saw some major gameplay and engine upgrades, along with having licenses of your favorite clubs.
The changes in 2011’s edition was crucial in overpassing PES and becoming number 1 on the market by a large margin. The game had more fluid movements, fewer bugs, better AI, etc. EA responded well to fan feedback and criticism at the time and it paid off big time, which isn’t something you hear about EA these days.

Zoran Papak

73. Middle-earth: Shadow of Mordor (2014)

For fans of J. R. R. Tolkien’s Middle Earth, Shadow of Mordor was the game to play. Its gameplay was a fluid and satisfying blend of stealth-based combat and hack-and-slash fighting. At times, Talion may be a slightly forgettable protagonist. However, his merging with Celebrimbor makes for an interesting relationship between the two characters. Once you learn of Celebrimbor’s link to The One Ring, there is a weight added to each action you take. As a result, there is a very welcome link to the larger legendarium of Tolkien’s work. The highlight of Shadow of Mordor, however, is easily its’ Nemesis System. It elevates the personality of the game’s antagonistic NPCs, making each clash with them much more meaningful.

Kyle Wilson

74. Jak and Daxter Collection (2012)

The Jak and Daxter series was a huge part of many a childhood, mine included. Thankfully, you don’t need to keep your PS2 around to play them, as the Naughty Dog trilogy now have both PS3 and PS4 have remastered ports. The PS3 version supports 720p 60 frames per second, while the PS4 version runs (sometimes) at 1080p 60 FPS. Additionally, the underrated Jak X: Combat Racing is included in the PS4 version. Whether you’re collecting precursor orbs in The Precursor Legacy, blasting enemies in Jak II, or racing in the desert in Jak 3, the Jak and Daxter Collection will still stand up to scrutiny for years to come.

Zachary Whyte

75. BioShock Infinite (2013)

Bioshock Infinite’s gameplay has a feeling of wonder and heart-pulsing excitement with the introduction of magnetic rails that allow free movement around the map, having a supporting character that you don’t have to dote over, and a sort of magic system that combos with your weapons, melee attacks, and movement very well. However, the gameplay only acts in service of its overarching story. Like the other two entries in the Bioshock series, Infinite concerns itself with a sprawling story that comments on political ideology, where our place is in the universe, and how much our choices matter to ourselves and those around us. The characters all feel real, with great writing and voice acting that perfectly encapsulates their emotions. It’s a wild ride, for sure.

—William Saimo

76. Assassin’s Creed: Brotherhood (2010)

Remember when Assassin’s Creed was awesome? I do! Assassin’s Creed Brotherhood takes everything great about Assassin’s Creed 2 and improves upon it. The main new feature the game introduces is a new management system; the player can recruit new assassins, and you can then send these assassins on assignments or call them in for support during missions. Your students will start out as novices but will gain experience over time. In addition, Assassin’s Creed Brotherhood was the first game in the main series to feature a multiplayer mode where players are required to use their assassination and stealth skills. The players must hunt down targets while being hunted themselves, so it’s one big game of cat and mouse. Thankfully, you can play Brotherhood on The Ezio Collection released for PS4 and X-Box One. However, The Ezio Collection unfortunately doesn’t include the multiplayer modes.

Zachary Whyte

77. Pokémon: Let’s Go! (2018)

Image: Nintendo

I will admit it—I’m a genwunner. I love Generation 1, and playing this game was one of the happiest gaming moments of my life. Nintendo took a game that defined a large part of my childhood and brought it to life on a modern console. The art style is amazing. Everything is bright and vibrant, and every second is a joy to play. I had so much fun playing through one of my favourite games with a new lease of life. The only downside to the game is the Pokémon Go catching mechanics and that the game was a tad too easy. But those downsides are made up for with all of the positives. I really hope Nintendo continues the Let’s Go series alongside the main games and we see more games remade in the future.

David Coulson

78. XCOM 2 (2016)

XCOM is known for its strong tactical turn-based strategy gameplay. The strategy on the battlefield is half of the picture, as you have to manage character leveling, equipment manufacturing, research projects, and more. Add in permadeath and character customization, and you have an experience to lose hours to. Watching characters you put hours into developing die, knowing they can never come back, supplies a gravity to your decisions not often felt in modern video games.

Dan Tyrrell

79. NBA 2K13 (2012)

NBA 2K13 was just amazing from gameplay to game modes to music and editing your character. It was back in the day when 2K Games actually improved year by year and people were excited to buy a copy of the game for a reason.

The game introduced the right stick shooting that added to the versatility of the offensive gameplay. It feels like 2K has struggled to add new things and improvements to the game after this edition. 2K is dominating the market for basketball simulations no matter what, but 2K13 was the culmination of years of constant improvement, and most of the fans have nothing but good memories of the game.

Zoran Papak

80. Batman: Arkham Knight (2015)

Batman: Arkham Knight is easily the best of the series and of the Caped Crusader in a video game. (Sorry, Lego Batman!) It has everything a Batman fan could ask for and more. Nearly every major villain makes an appearance. Furthermore, the illusive Arkham Knight provides a truly incredible plot-twist in the game’s final act. Gotham has never felt larger, or more detailed. Arkham Knight is consistently on form with high-quality graphics and fluid combat. Plus, who can say they don’t enjoy a performance from the legendary Kevin Conroy as Batman?

Kyle Wilson

81. Hitman: Absolution (2012)

I owe this game a lot on a personal level. At one point, I got stuck and turned to YouTube for a guide and realised that if I’m watching someone play games on YouTube, why wouldn’t someone watch me? I’m now nearing my 6th year making YouTube content thanks to this game.


But enough about me. Let’s talk Hitman. I was never the biggest Hitman fan growing up, but I love everything about this game. The levels aren’t very linear. Most give you various different options of routes you can take, ways you can either get past or eliminate your target, and there are a lot of different disguises you can use, etc. The gameplay is great and works really well. I don’t really have any complaints about this game. Most people say that Blood Money is the pinnacle of the Hitman series, but Absolution definitely sits at the top of the ladder for me.

David Coulson

82. Snake Pass (2017)

One of the most unique platformers of the decade, Snake Pass is all about slithering around and using snake physics to climb your way around and collect shinies. Forget about high-speed, reaction-based platforming. In this game, you will be meticulously climbing bamboo poles hoping that Noodle, the snake, holds on long enough to reach the next pole. The game isn’t long, but it provides growing challenges appropriate for snakes alongside a simple story. The low price of the game and the uniqueness of the game makes it worth trying for everyone. Snake Pass is available on Microsoft Windows, Xbox One, PS4, and Nintendo Switch.

Jeanette Eicher

83. Gears of War 3 (2011)

With fans of the series not expecting another Gears title, Gears of War 3 had a lot to live up to following Gears of War 2. Thankfully, it did that and more. Marcus Fenix and Delta Squad have never looked so good. They have never played so smoothly. The campaign was heart-wrenching, tense throughout, and the multiplayer was never better. It is difficult to deny that Epic Games did a fantastic job, and Gears of War 3 wholly deserves to be on this list.

Kyle Wilson

84. Pro Evolution Soccer 2011 (2010)

Konami’s Pro Evolution Soccer dominated the genre of football simulations in the 2000s, but they dropped the ball in the early 2010s and haven’t properly recovered to this day. PES always had problems with clubs licensing, but the gameplay was so good and fun that FIFA never stood a chance. PES 11 was probably the last “good” game in the years since, and it was downhill from that point on. In the honor of Master League legends Castolo, Minanda, Ivarov, and the crew, PES 11 has to make the list.

Zoran Papak

85. Titanfall 2 (2016)

Image: EA

The Titanfall series has undoubtedly changed the first-person shooter genre. Titanfall 2 has only built and improved upon the first game’s successes. It offers players a sought-after look into the lore of the Titanfall universe through a well-executed single-player campaign. As a result, it is simply exciting to play. There is nothing quite as satisfying as calling in a Titan mid-firefight, whether that is during the campaign or online. Titanfall 2 perfectly balances fast-paced gunplay as a pilot with wall-running and grapple-hooks as well as a slower but more explosive experience when piloting a Titan.

Kyle Wilson

86. Banished (2014)

The best fully survival-based city builder PvE experience around. A lot of city-building games will end up being too easy due to the harmless environment or less of a city builder due to the implementation of enemy units. Banished, on the other hand, is difficult because of its harsh environments and people that absolutely will start falling over left and right if your production slips. No, really. I’ve lost cities due to a lack of tools while on a normal level of difficulty. As a city-builder, the game is still relaxing to sit back and play, but it provides a level of difficulty in the core of how you build up your city that will require some conquering. Banished is is only playable on Microsoft Windows.

Jeanette Eicher

87. Borderlands 2 (2012)

Image: Instant Gaming

With a gameplay loop that took what was great from the first and polished it down to a shine, Borderlands 2 excels. It feels great to shoot, use abilities, and throw grenades, and looting the heck out of your enemies never gets old. However, Borderlands 2 is still memorable today for its superb writing. Similar to the popular web series Red vs Blue, Borderlands 2 has a mix of drama and slapstick comedy that would misstep and fall apart at the hands of even some of the best writing teams. What this also produced is one of the most memorable video game villains of all time: Handsome Jack. Even the subsequent DLC didn’t slack off on the writing and gameplay. Not to mention that as good as it is to play alone, inviting friends to play with you adds to the experience instead of diminishing from it.

—William Saimo

88. Hollow Knight (2017)

Image: Nintendo

If video games have one advantage over other entertainment mediums, it would be the use of interactive gameplay to add to the experience rather than taking away from it. Hollow Knight uses everything in its gameplay loop to set a mood of somber loneliness with glints of hope through a dark and depraved world and the dread of setting off into an area that you’re not sure you’re ready for. Like many Dark Souls-esque games, Hollow Knight compels not only the character but the player to get better as well. Added to this is a cast of delightful characters, heartbreaking moments of supreme hopelessness, and a world vibrating with personality. If there’s one thing that Hollow Knight made me feel, it was “wanting to set things right”, something that almost nothing outside of real-world experiences has given me.

—William Saimo

89. Hearthstone (2014)

Image: Hearthstone

Blizzard’s take on the card game genre, Hearthstone is a digital card game based around the World of Warcraft universe. In the game, you choose a class, build a deck using a mix of class-specific and neutral cards, and then play against other people. The game’s rules are easy to understand; you can do anything you want within the limits of your mana during your turn, then your opponent does the same. New card sets are constantly coming out, and old cards can be changed, so expect a shifting meta. There are also single-player dungeon-like modes and mini-campaigns where you must overcome an AI opponent with unique rules. You can also play games against real people with bent rules during weekly tavern brawl. The game can be downloaded and played for free through the Blizzard client.

Jeanette Eicher

90. Sleeping Dogs (2012)

Image: United Front Games

After a troubled start as another entry in the True Crime series, the game that would become Sleeping Dogs was picked up by publisher Square Enix, and this martial arts action-adventure game set in a commendably recreated (if necessarily scaled down) Hong Kong Island first kicked its way onto the market in 2012.


Sleeping Dogs has the blood of Hong Kong cinema coursing through its veins; the references interspersed throughout are too many to list here, and the game’s vistas are distinct and gorgeous, ranging from teeming night markets segueing right into the shadow of modern skyscrapers as the player follows undercover cop Wei Shen’s grueling rise through the ranks of the Sun On Yee triad while wielding an arsenal of hard-hitting martial arts moves.


An ambitious sequel was axed in 2013, and a spin-off, Triad Wars, similarly received the touch of death in 2015. I’d played it myself toward the end of its life; it was a pseudo-MMO (think Clash of Clans) not truly inhabited by concurrent players except that rival triad (player) compounds were located at predetermined points on the map, and the player was tasked with raiding these locations while fighting off henchmen in a race against the clock before the police arrived. Triad Wars had a rather repetitive gameplay loop, at times frustrating with its watered-down RPG-lite mechanics adding an artificial layer of difficulty to the juggling of enemy archetypes when every second counted, and each encounter ended, inevitably, against the big bad boss himself—the rival player’s avatar.


Despite all this, we may yet see a return to the Sleeping Dogs world in the form of a film, with Donnie Yen along for the ride.

—Thomas Fitzpatrick

91. Kingdoms and Castles (2017)

One of my favorite city builders. The game is extraordinarily simple, but it takes this into every part of the game: mechanics, art style, and difficulty. In Kingdoms and Castles, you build up a quaint little city to fund your beautiful castle, tax people, then protect them from Viking Invaders. The game is available on Steam and receives regular free updates and added features based on community recommendations. Overall, the game has a laid-back playstyle where you can just relax and watch your citizens bounce around while you mess around in this kingdom-building sandbox game. Until Vikings burn all your food, then it’s time to get serious. As a simpler game, it can be played on Microsoft Windows, Linux, and Macintosh.

Jeanette Eicher

92. Divinity Original Sin 2 (2017)

Image: Steam

Do you like DnD? Do you like turn-based strategy? Do you like a challenge? Then you must play Divinity Original Sin 2. The combat is amazing, with the most unique aspect of it being the field effects and grid-free movement and spells. The game is all about leveling your character and exploring the world as they advance through the story. Characters are fully customizable, or you can play as preset characters that have an additional character-specific side quest. The replayability is off the charts for this game because of characters, classes, and story choices. The game makes for a great co-op experience both online and split-screen as well since the party functions like a DnD party. Divinity Original Sin 2 can be played on Microsoft Windows, Xbox One, PS4, and Nintendo Switch.

Jeanette Eicher

93. Mortal Kombat 11 (2019)

Image: Nintedo

FINISH HIM! That phrase will never get old. I first discovered Mortal Kombat way back in about 1994 with MK2 on the SNES, and the series has stuck with me ever since. Mortal Kombat 11 is the latest entry, having only released this year. Continuing on with the rebooted timeline, the series has 2 separate timelines. It’s quite confusing. The game focuses on and fleshes out a lot of the story from previous games, and all (well, most) of your favourite characters make a return from Liu Kang, Kung Lao, Johnny Cage & Raiden to Scorpion, Sub Zero & more as well as new characters such as Cassie Cage. Rebooting Mortal Kombat and starting fresh was a great decision, and the series keeps going from strength to strength. I’m excited to see where the games are headed next.

David Coulson

94. Mortal Kombat (2011)

After the Mortal Kombat series was seemingly done with Mortal Kombat Armageddon, we finally got a brand new Mortal Kombat game in 2011 that completely overhauled the series. The game’s story began at the end of Armageddon with Raiden telepathically communicating with his former self during the events of Mortal Kombat 1 which led to history being altered and creating 2 timelines. Its quite confusing having the original timeline and the new timeline, but it allowed the developers to retell the story while still using all the characters we grew up with, as well as allowing them to correct some mistakes. Since Mortal Kombat 2011, the series has been a breath of fresh air and has once again become a beloved series.

David Coulson

95. Gravity Rush 2 (2017)

Image: PlayStation

96. Rayman Origins (2011)

Image: Origin

Rayman goes back to its roots and goes full 2D, but this time its so much better than before. Rayman Origins & Legends are 2 of the best 2D platformers I have ever played. The art style is quirky and very easy on the eyes, the gameplay is silky smooth, and the game is quite humorous. Each level is well-designed and a joy to play. I would put these Rayman games toe to toe with any 2D platforming game, including Mario, and these will either match or exceed virtually every single one of them.

David Coulson

97. Battlefield 1 (2016)

Image: Origin

After we all came together to universally hate the Call of Duty: Infinite Warfare trailer, DICE delivered to us one the greatest Battlefield and first-person shooters of all time. Set in the dark and grim period of World War 1, a setting rarely seen and a welcome change from the futuristic games we were getting at the time. Battlefield 1 was a breath of fresh air in the FPS genre with 64-player multiplayer battles, intense Operations, and a compelling campaign. BF1 left us with an experience that is still a blast to play. I’ll take this over Battlefield 5 any day.

Zachary Whyte

98. Hellblade: Senua’s Sacrifice (2017)

Image: Nintedo

Hellblade is one of the rare Double-A games on the market—not quite as large of a budget as a Triple-A title, but all of the same polish. What stands out with Hellblade is the sound design. While the story, gameplay, and art design are all phenomenal, it’s the sound engineering that makes it pop. I won’t spoil much more, but Hellblade is a must-play title if you haven’t already.

Dan Tyrrell

99. Pokémon Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire (2014)

Image: Nintedo

Pokémon Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire are remakes of the third generation of Pokémon. The game includes updated mechanics, such as mega evolution and fairy type. It is a turn based RPG where you build and raise Pokémon to fight while exploring the Hoenn region. Many of the complaints about the original games were fixed, such as the glorious amount of water paired with a slow surfing speed. The game has enjoyable characters and Pokémon, and unique features include riding above the region on either Latios or Latias, primal versions of the box legendaries, two villain teams, and Pokémon beauty contests. It is one of the more well-received Pokémon games by both fans and critics. Pokémon ORAS can be played on the Nintendo 3DS.

Jeanette Eicher

100. Final Fantasy 15 (2016)

The journey of Noctis and his companions is a heart-clenching tale of brotherhood and friendship. From camping with your party to fighting an evil empire, by the time the story comes to its climatic end, you’ll feel like you have been on a road trip with them the entire time. Even after the initial release, there has been a steady flow of new content. The Episode DLCs are story-focused chapters that add depth to the characters, and the Comrades multiplayer expansion is a whole new experience that allows you to join other players in hunting and slaying monsters. Final Fantasy 15 is a once in a lifetime experience.

—Eric Bogart


That was the top 100 games of the decade. Be sure to let us know in the comments where your favourite game of the decade appeared.

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